A how-to guide for anyone who wants to know how to grow herbs indoors from seeds. These 3 plants, parsley, basil and cilantro are easy to plant and grow on your windowsill or kitchen.
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DIY | How to Grow Windowsill Herbs at Home

Reposted from The Good Trade. Check out my monthly posts on green living here and at thegoodtrade.com! 

If you’re anything like me, the start of spring always finds my mind wandering to fresh air and open windows, bustling farmer’s markets and even (dare I say it?) a thriving backyard vegetable garden. However, sometimes it takes a little longer for those cold snaps to warm up and the frozen ground to thaw than we’d like to admit. What’s the next best thing? Windowsill gardens.

Whether or not you have a green thumb, windowsill gardens aren’t as difficult as they might seem and are good practice for tending to pickier and more temperamental plants down the road. Plus, there’s nothing that can brighten up your space more than a colorful windowsill garden.

Ready to get started? Here are three herbs to start growing in your kitchen to help you green up your apartment this spring.

A how-to guide for anyone who wants to know how to grow herbs indoors from seeds. These 3 plants, parsley, basil and cilantro are easy to plant and grow on your windowsill or kitchen.

How To Grow Potted Basil Indoors

Basil is an easy-to-grow plant that is happiest in a warm, sunny spot like your kitchen window. It’s quick to sprout from seed and easy to keep happy, just give it plenty of water when you notice it’s dry to the touch and always water at the base of the plant. Pinch off the leaves to use as it grows with your thumb and forefinger to encourage a fuller plant as the leaves grow back. Be sure it has good drainage, plus rich, pH-neutral soil to prevent root rot. If it begins to bloom and produce a flower, snip the buds off to keep it healthy.

  • Plant a few seedlings 1⁄4 inch beneath the soil’s surface
  • Use loose soil for good drainage
  • Mist as a seedling and keep moderately damp when fully grown
  • Warm temperature, around 70 degrees
  • Plenty of sunshine (at least six hours a day)

How To Grow Potted Parsley Indoors

Parsley is a lot like basil and does well with plenty of sun, loose, damp soil and a warm room to thrive. You can easily plant basil and parsley herbs together in one medium-sized pot or separately in a small pot. Parsley will need a little space to itself, so if too many seeds sprout make sure you trim away a few stems so the pot won’t get overcrowded. If the tray underneath the pot collects excess water empty it out to prevent root rot.

A quick note about plant varieties: Curly Parsley has frilly leaves that are beautiful but not as aromatic or flavorful as Italian Parsley which has wide, flat leaves and a stronger taste. Whichever variety you choose will be delicious but if you are wondering, there is a difference between the two!

  • Plant a few seedlings 1⁄4 inch beneath the soil’s surface
  • Use loose soil for good drainage
  • Mist as a seedling and keep moderately damp when fully grown
  • Warm temperature, around 70 degrees
  • Plenty of sunshine (at least six hours a day)

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How to Grow Potted Cilantro Indoors

A cilantro plant grows better naturally outside than it does on a windowsill, but don’t let that deter you from starting your seeds! All it needs is a little extra TLC and attention and you’ll be surprised at how this aromatic and brightly-colored plant thrives in your kitchen. Plus, fresh cilantro in guacamole and on tacos is a must.

Make sure that your soil is a mixture of nutrient-rich potting soil and sand or small pebbles. Cilantro needs good aeration and drainage to grow well. You’ll know that you have the right mix when the water drains entirely from the pot’s drainage holes. Be mindful of which windowsill your cilantro plant lives on — it doesn’t like intense heat and can get scorched by too much direct sun, so an east-facing window is best. A growing light also works well. When harvesting the cilantro, pinch off the leaves with your thumb and forefinger to promote a full and bushy plant as the buds grow back.

  • Plant seedlings beneath the soil surface
  • Use half soil and half sand mixture to promote air and water circulation
  • Mist as a seedling and keep moderately damp as an adult
  • Warm temperatures, around 65-70 degrees
  • Indirect sunshine, about four to five hours per day

 

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